President Bush"s judicial nominations during the 101st and 102nd Congresses

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Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress , [Washington, D.C.]
Judges -- United States -- Selection and appointment, Nominations for office -- United S
StatementDenis Steven Rutkus
SeriesMajor studies and issue briefs of the Congressional Research Service -- 1992, reel 1, fr. 00821
ContributionsLibrary of Congress. Congressional Research Service
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination29 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15459468M

President Bush's Judicial Nominations During the st and nd Congresses. President Bush’s Judicial Nominations During the st and nd Congresses Summary There are ten categories of courts (including the local courts of the District of Columbia) to which the President nominates judges.

The following report provides background and statistics concerning President Bush’s judicial.

Description President Bush"s judicial nominations during the 101st and 102nd Congresses EPUB

Breakdowns, for both the st and nd Congresses, of the number of nominations received by the Senate, conf irmed, or failing to receive Senate confirmation. At the end of each section, a table lists President Bush’s pertinent court nominations during the st and nd Congresses, including nomination dates,Author: Denis Steven Rutkus.

There are ten categories of courts (including the local courts of the District of Columbia) to which the President nominates judges. The report provides background and statistics concerning President Bush's judicial nominations in each court category as well as actions taken on those nominations by the United States Senate.

Each of the report's ten sections discusses the composition and Author: Denis Steven Rutkus. Wikileaks release: February 2, Publisher: United States Congressional Research Service.

Title: President Bush's Judicial Nominations During the st and nd Congresses. CRS report number: Author(s): Denis Steven Rutkus, Specialist in American National Government, Government Division Date: Ma Abstract There are ten categories of courts.

President Bush's Judicial Nominations During the st and nd Congresses. The report provides background and statistics concerning President Bush's judicial nominations in each court category as well as actions taken on those nominations by the United States Senate.

Each of the report's ten sections discusses the composition and Author: Denis Steven Rutkus and Government Division. George W.

Download President Bush"s judicial nominations during the 101st and 102nd Congresses FB2

Bush was president of the United States from to During his time in office he had judges successfully nominated and confirmed to the federal bench. Bush had 14 nominees withdrawn and received no vote from the Senate.

During President George W. Bush's two term tenure in office, a few of his nominations for federal judgeships were blocked by the Senate Democrats either directly in the Senate Judiciary Committee or on the full Senate floor in various procedural moves, including the first use of a fillibuster to block a Federal Appeals Court nominee.

Republicans labeled it an unwarranted obstruction of. The Senate has overwhelmingly approved the first three of President Bush's judicial nominees, including Roger Gregory, the first black judge to serve on the 4th Circuit. When Mr. Bush became President last year, many lawyers and groups that monitor judicial selection were uncertain whether he would carry.

The nd United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of met in Washington, DC from January 3,to January 3,during the last two years of the administration of U.S.

President George H. Bush. The apportionment of seats in this House of. During George H. Bush's term in office as the President of the United States of America, he nominated 11 individuals for 10 different federal appellate judgeships who were not processed by the Democratic-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee.

The Republicans claim that Senate Democrats of the nd Congress on purpose tried to keep open particular judgeships as a political maneuver to allow. The st United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

It met in Washington, DC from January 3,to January 3,during the final weeks of the administration of U.S. President Ronald Reagan and the first two years of the administration of U.S. During President George W.

Bush's two term tenure in office, some of his nominations for federal judgeships were blocked by the Senate Democrats either directly in the Senate Judiciary Committee or on the full Senate floor in various procedural moves, including the first use of a fillibuster to block a Federal Appeals Court nominee.

[1] Republicans labeled it an unwarranted obstruction of. Judicial Nominations. President George W. Bush looks on during the swearing-in ceremony for U.S.

Supreme Court Justice Samuel A. Alito, Tuesday, Feb. 1, in the East Room of the White House, sworn-in by U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. Alito's wife, Martha-Ann, their son Phil and daughter, Laura, are seen to the right. President George H.W. Bush and his challenger, Arkansas Gov.

Bill Clinton, square off in the first presidential debate of Democrats stopped the judicial nomination process to leave seats. Ratings of judicial nominees are posted by Congressional session and are available for those nominated during the st Congress to the present.

The rating chart for current nominees is updated regularly. th Congress () th Congress () th Congress () th Congress () th Congress (). On July 1,President George H. Bush nominated Clarence Thomas for the Supreme Court of the United States to replace Thurgood Marshall, who had announced his retirement.

The nomination proceedings were contentious from the start, especially over the issue of abortion, and many women's groups and civil rights groups opposed Thomas on the basis of his conservative political views, as. The panel discussed how the president’s Supreme Court nominees may play as a campaign issue and how the Supreme Court has changed during the Reagan and Bush administrations.

nominations by other recent Presidents. See CRS ReportJudicial Nominations by President Clinton During the rdth Congresses, by Denis Steven Rutkus, and CRS ReportPresident [George H. W.] Bush’s Judicial Nominations During the stnd Congresses, by Denis Steven Rutkus. President Bush on Monday submitted 20 judicial nominees, including seven U.S.

Circuit Court nominees whom Democrats filibustered in the last Congress. “I'm pleased that the president has renominated these excellent women and men to serve on the federal bench," said Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, Tennessee Republican.

The Senate returned substantially more nominations during the nd, th, and th Congresses than during any other Congresses in the period. The average number of days between nomination date and final action increased in Congresses ending in presidential election years.

Indeed the 99th, st, nd, and rd Congresses all ended without a single judicial nomination left on the Senate calendar. The Democratic Senate majority in the two Congresses of the Bush Administration ended both those Congresses, the st and nd, without a single judicial nomination on the calendar.

nominations during earlier Cong resses, see CRS Report RL, U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations by President George W. Bush During the thth Congresses. This report will be updated to record ne w actions by President Bush, the Senate Judiciary Committee, or the Senate involving Article III lower court nominations.

Remarks by the President During Federal Judicial Appointees Announcement The East Room. Listen to the President's Remarks.

P.M. EDT. THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all very much. Attorney General, it's good to see you, sir, and happy birthday. The Republican-controlled Senate is now poised to confirm President Bush's roster of highly conservative nominees to the federal courts of appeals.

If confirmed, these nominees will tilt all 13 of those courts decisively to the right. The soul of the federal judiciary thus hangs in the balance. “Judicial Nominations by President Bush During the st and nd Congresses.” CRS Reportfor Congress: March   In exchange, Bush agreed not to invoke his constitutional power to make recess appointments while Congress is away, as he has done twice in recent months with judicial nominees.

A comparison of judicial vacancies during the first terms of President Bush and President Obama shows a stark contrast to the way in which we moved to reduce judicial vacancies during the last Republican presidency.

During President Bush's first term we reduced the number of judicial vacancies by almost 75 percent. President Bush might want to consider hiring benchwarmers -- his most controversial judicial nominees may have to wait until before reaching even the first step to getting confirmed.

The U.S. Congress officially recognized the Noahide Laws in legislation which was passed by both houses. Congress and the President of the United States, George Bush, indicated in Public Lawnd Congress, that the United States of America was founded upon the Seven Universal Laws of Noah, and that these Laws have been the bedrock of society from the dawn of.

During George H.W. Bush's term in office as the President of the United States of America, he nominated 11 individuals for 10 different federal appellate judgeships who were not processed by the Democratic-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee. The Republicans claim that Senate Democrats of the nd Congress on purpose tried to keep open particular judgeships as a political maneuver to allow.

At the Federalist Society’s Texas Chapters’ Conference on Septem the final panel offered a ten-year retrospective of the Bush Administration’s judicial appointments.

Details President Bush"s judicial nominations during the 101st and 102nd Congresses EPUB

On the panel were Rachel Brand (who served as Associate Counsel and Assistant AG in the Office of Legal Policy), Reginald J. Brown (special Assistant to the President), Leonard Leo (Executive Vice President for. In submitting his first list of judicial nominees to the th Congress, the president left off the names of four nominees whom the previous Congress had failed to confirm.

Bush .